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      2. California Takes the Lead in Regulating PFAS Chemicals in Drinking Water

        February 2020

        California finds itself once again taking the lead by setting regulatory standards stricter than the rest of the nation. At issue is the nearly ubiquitous presence of certain PFAS chemicals in drinking water, a problem being addressed to varying degrees by many states and federal regulators.

        California finds itself once again taking the lead by setting regulatory standards stricter than the rest of the nation. At issue is the nearly ubiquitous presence of certain PFAS chemicals in drinking water, a problem being addressed to varying degrees by many states and federal regulators. On Feb. 6, the California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) lowered its reporting levels to below the thresholds set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), requiring water agencies in California to take action earlier than water agencies anywhere else in the country.

        The PFAS family of chemicals are synthetic organic compounds known for their resistance to stains and heat and their nonstick, waterproof qualities. These qualities have led to PFAS chemicals being used in innumerable applications, from fast food wrappers to stain-resistant fabric and carpet to firefighting foam. Unfortunately, the same qualities that make PFAS chemicals so useful also cause them to persist in the environment, accumulating in soil and groundwater without degrading for decades.

        Read more here: https://bit.ly/32s4c1x

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